Possession

Possession Charges in Oakland County

Were you arrested for possession?

If you were recently arrested for possessing a controlled substance or possessing prescription medication without a valid prescription, you could be facing serious consequences. In Michigan, drug possession is covered under Section 333.7403 of the Public Health Code.

Under Section 7403 (1), it states that a person shall not knowingly or intentionally possess a controlled substance or a prescription unless it was obtained direction from a valid prescription order from a medical doctor. The penalties for possession vary depending upon the type of drug and the quantity with fines ranging anywhere between a maximum of $1,000 to $1,000,000.00 in extreme cases. The majority of possession offenses deal with smaller quantities of drugs, with the penalties including:

Prescriptions – Possession of a prescription medication without a valid prescription is a misdemeanor and punishable by a maximum jail term of one year or a maximum $1,000 fine or both.

Marijuana – Possession of marijuana is a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum jail term of one year or a $2,000 fine or both.

LSD, Peyote, Mescaline, or a Schedule 5 Controlled Substance – Possession of any of these drugs is classified as a misdemeanor offense punishable by a term of imprisonment not to exceed one year and a maximum $2,000 fine or both.

Schedule 1, 2, 3, or 4 Controlled Substances – Possession of a Schedule 1, 2, 3, or 4 controlled substance is a felony offense punishable by years of imprisonment and a hefty fines, or both.

Oakland County Drug Crime Attorney

When someone possesses large quantities of drugs, the penalties and sentencing increase significantly. For example, possession of 25 grams or more, but less than 50 grams of any mixture containing a controlled substance is punishable by up to four years in prison or a maximum $25,000 fine or both, whereas possession of 50 grams or more but less than 450 grams of any mixture containing a controlled substance is punishable by not more than 20 years in prison or a maximum $250,000 fine or both.

Michigan law suspends driver's licenses for drug convictions, even if the offender wasn't driving at the time of the offense. If the person doesn't have any prior drug violations, their driver's license will be suspended for six months. However, one or more prior drug convictions in seven years will result in a one year license suspension.

If you were arrested on drug charges, contact our Farmington Hills office, drug crime attorney Daniel D. Hajji right away. Attorney Daniel D. Hajji will carefully review your case to search for any mitigating evidence or flaws in the case that may get your charges reduced or dropped entirely. With an aggressive criminal defense attorney working on your case, your chances of reaching a favorable case outcome are far greater, and when your future is on the line, securing the right lawyer is well worth the investment.